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Qatar “Ultras” and fleeing audience: The World Cup kick-off for the fans

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Ivan
Ivan
I have been working in the news industry for over 6 years, first as a reporter and now as an editor. I have covered politics extensively, and my work has appeared in major newspapers and online news outlets around the world. In addition to my writing, I also contribute regularly to 24 Hours World.
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After a disappointing performance, Qatar lost the opening match against Ecuador 0-2. But not only in terms of sport did the start of the World Cup leave a lot to be desired. The “fans” also raised questions.

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After a disappointing performance, Qatar lost the opening match against Ecuador 0-2. But not only in terms of sport did the start of the World Cup leave a lot to be desired. The “fans” also raised questions.

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On the one hand, the majority of the spectators left the stadium well before the final whistle, so that the seats were half empty in the 75th minute. Many supporters had had enough before the half-time whistle. Originally, 60,000 supporters had come to Al Khor’s Al Bayt Stadium.

“FIFA fan leaders” and “fake” ultras

Second, a significant portion of Qatari fans were not from Qatar at all. This was reported by reporters Patrick Berger and Kerry Hau. The two sport1-journalistsmet two South American fans on site who repeatedly shouted “Qatar, the best World Cup ever!” screamed while being filmed by local supporters. When asked, it turned out that the two South Americans were “FIFA fan leaders” whose flight to the emirate had been financed by the world association. In addition, they would not receive any money, the fan duo emphasized.

The Qatar “ultras” in the burgundy jerseys, who were seen several times during the TV broadcast and were responsible for the atmosphere, were also mostly not from Qatar. Many of them stated that they were guest workers from Ethiopia, Bangladesh, Nepal or Egypt. “Most, however, came from Arab countries that see themselves as Bedouins and apparently stick with Qatar,” explains sports1.

The reporters Berger and Hau also noticed the prayer rooms in the stadium. Numerous devotees also prayed on the ground between the grandstand staircases. A somewhat bizarre observation related to the food supply in the stadium, because the supplies at the serving stands were used up shortly after kick-off. From then on, fans could only buy drinks.

“Natzes Nutmeg” – The 90-minute talk with Nadine Angerer on the 2022 World Cup in Qatar

Everything about the 2022 World Cup in 90 minutes:

This article was originally published on 90min.de as.

Source: Stern

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