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What psychology is behind the election posters

What psychology is behind the election posters
The EU Parliament, a place of longing: How are the campaigns designed by the candidates to seek a mandate?
ÖVP leading candidate Reinhold Lopatka uses simple messages on his posters that deliberately leave room for interpretation.
According to the media psychologist, SPÖ candidate Andreas Schieder also opted for a similar strategy to Lopatka.
The FPÖ shows too many topics on one poster, all of which are negative, on the posters of the first campaign phase.
A representation of the “absolutely good” with currently completely opposite reporting: The campaign of the green top candidate Lena Schilling.
The Neos tell a story using a series of pictures – and they do it very well, as expert Witzeling judges.
The only rhyme of the election campaigns so far: The KPÖ is calling for “housing instead of cannons” in the EU elections.

LINZ. SPÖ candidate Andreas Schieder listens trustingly to a young woman with a tablet in his hands. While Reinhold Lopatka from the ÖVP wants to “protect Europe’s borders”, the Green Party’s Lena Schilling calls for “heart instead of agitation” – at the same time the FPÖ complains about “eco-communism and warmongering”.

25 days before the EU elections, the election campaign is clearly visible on the billboards. But what do the slogan, images and design actually say about the party and the candidates themselves? The OÖNachrichten spoke to Daniel Witzeling, social scientist and head of the Human Institute Vienna, about the “psychology behind the posters”.

One thing in advance: Even in a digitalized world, election posters are very popular as a medium (more on this on page 3). “It is less useful for attracting new voters, but rather as a signal to the core electorate,” says Witzeling. On the surface, the impression should be left that “we’re doing something anyway,” says media psychologist Witzeling.

Posters as a Rorschach test

And what message should be conveyed? According to Witzeling, there are many strategies in the poster campaign. The two major parties, ÖVP and SPÖ, both chose “very simple messages” and a lot of room for interpretation – consciously, as the expert says.

ÖVP leading candidate Reinhold Lopatka uses simple messages on his posters that deliberately leave room for interpretation.
Image: APA/EVA MANHART

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ÖVP leading candidate Reinhold Lopatka uses simple messages on his posters that deliberately leave room for interpretation.
Image: APA/EVA MANHART

Source: Nachrichten

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