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Carsten Maschmeyer comments on the discussion about “lazy” Germans

Carsten Maschmeyer comments on the discussion about “lazy” Germans

Do Germans have to work more? Carsten Maschmeyer has a clear answer to this question. The investor known from the show “The Lions’ Den” takes a stand on Instagram.

The Germans are lazy and don’t work enough: a columnist made headlines with this statement a few days ago. Similar tones could also be heard from German politics, for example when Federal Finance Minister Christian Lindner (FDP) said on the talk show “Caren Miosga” that he wanted to “woke people up for working overtime”. Rainer Dulger, President of the German Employers’ Associations, told the “Bild” newspaper: “We need an increase in the working hours of the people who already work here.”

Carsten Maschmeyer: Results are more important than working hours

Now Carsten Maschmeyer joins the discussion. As an entrepreneur he has earned billions. Many people may also know him as an investor in the Vox program “The Lions’ Den”. In an Instagram posting, Maschmeyer describes his views on the subject of working hours. The article says, among other things: “Anyone who measures work performance purely in hours worked is really living in the last century. Because results count, not the working hours worked.” The 64-year-old describes calls for increased working hours as “sham debates that miss the core problem.”

He cites Cambodia and Myanmar as examples of the countries with the highest number of hours. “That’s what we want to measure ourselves against?” asks Maschmeyer. He also has a suggested solution: “We need something completely different: the will to perform and the renaissance of the idea of ​​achievement. But all of this is not measured in working hours, but in results. It is not time that finances our prosperity, but success.”

Maschmeyer’s comments are well received by his 178,000 followers. “I would like more employers to have such a great attitude. People would be happier and Germany would be more successful,” writes one user. Another commented: “Performance counts. There are still a lot of professions where time is ‘served’, especially in the area of ​​public service. I think that’s absolutely not up-to-date. There should be a rethink here.”

In some cases there are critical voices. A follower notes: “Unfortunately, traditional trades and service jobs are measured by working hours regardless of success. If the bakery, supermarket or pharmacy is not open from around 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., many customers have a problem. The same applies for hairdressers, social workers, nurses, daycare teachers, doctors… the list is long.”

Entrepreneur Carsten Maschmeyer in an interview

Maschmeyer sees time for a four-day week: “The dam has broken”

04:34 minutes

Maschmeyer advocates the four-day week

Maschmeyer also speaks publicly in favor of the four-day week. In a post for in February this year, he wrote: “It may come as a surprise to many, but as an investor I am not afraid of the four-day week. It is coming anyway and I am convinced that everyone will benefit from it.” It doesn’t “make a difference” to him how many days a company’s employees work, “as long as the goals are achieved.” “The four-day week finally makes work more attractive again. (…) Many younger people also want to work – who are not lazy, as their generation is often told,” says Maschmeyer.

Source: Stern

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