24hoursworld

Thuringia: Survey: BSW gains, AfD loses popularity slightly

Thuringia: Survey: BSW gains, AfD loses popularity slightly

A few months before the state elections in Thuringia, the Sahra Wagenknecht alliance continued to improve in a new Insa survey. In contrast, there is a slight minus for the Left and the AfD.

Four months before the state elections in Thuringia, the Sahra Wagenknecht alliance continues to make gains in an Insa survey, while the AfD loses slightly in popularity. The newly founded party led by former left-wing politician Wagenknecht achieved 16 percent in the representative Insa survey published on Wednesday on behalf of Funke-Medien Thuringia. Compared to an Insa survey from mid-March, this means an increase of three percentage points. The AfD loses one percentage point in this comparison and achieves 30 percent approval in the new survey. An Infratest-dimap survey from mid-March had seen BSW at 15 percent and the AfD at 29 percent.

The new Insa survey further indicates difficult majority conditions in Thuringia. Prime Minister Bodo Ramelow’s left gets 16 percent (minus two percentage points) – and would be on a par with the BSW. The CDU with its top candidate Mario Voigt lost one percentage point compared to the Insa survey from mid-March and now has 20 percent. The FDP would miss out on entering the state parliament with two percent, while the Greens would have to worry about it with a figure of five percent. The SPD can improve slightly and reaches seven percent. Other parties are given at four percent. The margin of error for the survey is plus/minus three percentage points.

A new state parliament will be elected on September 1st

According to the survey, a coalition of the CDU, BSW, SPD and the Greens would have a mathematical majority – which together come to 48 percent. An alliance of the CDU, BSW and the Left would also have a majority of 52 percent, but is not considered politically feasible because the CDU rules out coalitions with the Left and the AfD.

A new state parliament will be elected in Thuringia on September 1st. Ramelow competes again. He is currently leading a minority government made up of the Left, the SPD and the Greens, which has to make do in parliament without its own majority and without a permanent partner to tolerate. In the past, the opposition had passed laws against the will of the government. Majorities for CDU or FDP initiatives, for example, were achieved with the help of AfD votes.

Source: Stern

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Posts